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Within CEE students may choose to major in either Civil Engineering or Environmental Engineering. Graduates from both programs earn an accredited Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and both programs are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET (www.abet.org). By receiving a degree from an accredited institution, CEE students are automatically eligible to take Part A of the NYS professional licensing exam. Graduates are also credited with eight years of Education/Experience towards the total of twelve years needed to be eligible to sit for the Professional Engineering Exam which is required in order to register as a Professional Engineer. Both curriculum choices include opportunities and requirements to take courses outside of engineering. We recognize and support students' evolving interests in the arts, humanities, social sciences, campus activities, and service opportunities, and urge CEE community members to explore these pursuits while studying at Cornell. Cornell freshmen and sophomores interested in affiliation with CEE should contact the CEE Undergraduate Coordinator. In addition, CEE offers minors in Engineering Management that is open to CEE students, as well as minors in Environmental Engineering and Civil Infrastructure that are open to students majoring in a different Engineering discipline at Cornell. 


Student Spotlight

Kristin Hamaguchi

Kristin Hamaguchi, a CEE undergraduate majoring in Civil Engineering, tells us about her internship at Northrop Grumman. read more

Bruno Fong-Martinez

Bruno Fong-Martinez is a CEE undergraduate student majoring in Civil Engineering. In this spotlight, he reveals his favorite part of Cornell and discusses his internship experience at AMEC. read more

Inshera Abedin

Inshera Abedin, a CEE undergraduate majoring in Civil Engineering, tells us about her Cornell CEE experiences and her summer internship at Clark Construction. read more

Did you know?

Professor Thomas O’Rourke (B.S. 1970), a specialist in the field of monitoring large construction projects, headed the team analyzing the impact of 9/11 attacks against New York City. The assessment found that the infrastructure of New York City survived the attack remarkably well, and led to creation of another team to determine the attributes of engineering that led to such resilience.